ART’s discussion series – data and privacy

Held 18 June 2021, 6.30 – 8.30 pm via zoom

Australian Governments are encouraging us to provide more and more personal data to be centrally stored and used by it to provide us with its services. The data we supply to government is also collected from us without our explicit knowledge. It might come from our clicks on government websites, or from cameras on roads and railway stations, or from data matching and modelling.

As a consequence, the quantum of knowledge that governments hold on us, and the risks of accident or misuse of such information has expanded, arguably in ways most people don’t really understand.

To improve our understanding of the implications of government data collection and privacy arrangements, there are a number of questions to explore about the larger context of the collection and keeping of such data:

• Is our acquiescence to personal data provision just a normal cost of efficient goods and services supply and security in modern society?
• Do we need to expressly recognise and address the power imbalance between individuals and government in addressing privacy?
• Do we need to expressly recognise and address the power imbalance between individuals and large corporations in addressing privacy?
• Do privacy laws need to move beyond their current focus on “personal information”?
• Is reliance on individual consent for data collection and use still fit for purpose?
• Should individuals be able to consent to data collection and use that has negative impacts on society as a whole?
• Is privacy a personal or a public right?
• What are some examples of privacy and data ‘best practice’ elsewhere?

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BLUEMMEL AIAL Forum – Information Laws