Donations – Our policy

August 2010

The reforms to political donations that ART would like to see

The Accountability Round Table’s starting premise is that the cost of election campaigns should be borne entirely by the State

Parliamentary reform – the post election promises so far..

This is a list to be updated as we hear of new Parliamentary reform promises and suggestions from Parliamentarians and other political players.


Christopher Pyne on time limits on answers, an independent speaker and a guarantee that private member's bills would be voted on

Election 2010 – Party committments to date

How are the major parties proposing to enhance Parliamentary integrity and accountability?

We have Election 2010 responses from Greens, Coalition and Labor. Read on…

OUR QUESTION 1

Do you support a comprehensive independent integrity system for the Commonwealth incorporating a general purpose Commonwealth anti-corruption agency, which includes educative, research and policy functions and which is provided with all necessary powers and is subject to parliamentary oversight?

OUR QUESTION 2

Do you support an enquiry by the Australian Law Reform Commission into regulation of the funding of political parties and candidates to achieve equality of access and integrity in our democratic system?


PARTIES & CANDIDATES  COMMITMENTS


Law Council of Australia – Election 2010

Law Council's poll of Major Party's electoral positions on key legal issues (Includes Legislatiive Standards reform)

In July 2010, the Law Council of Australia invited major political parties contesting the 2010 Federal Election to provide their views on key national issues of relevance to the Australian legal profession.
The Law Council prepared a document containing a list of issues and questions, and requested major political parties provide the details of their policy platform in relation to these key areas by 28 July 2010.

THE Accountability Round Table announces the Parliamentary Integrity Awards

The public picture of politicians rarely includes those politicians who conduct themselves with integrity, respecting the need for honest, open and accountable government.  In addition, there is  no public recognition of their integrity and no system to reward or encourage such integrity. The “Parliamentary Integrity Awards” are intended to fill that gap.

The Parliamentary Integrity Awards – Winners Announced

June 15 2010

PETRO GEORGIOU AND JOHN FAULKNER ANNOUNCED WINNERS OF INAUGURAL PARLIAMENTARY INTEGRITY AWARDS

Most attempts to improve political behaviour are based on negative consequences, curbing excesses by regulation and sanction. The Accountability Round Table awards are an endeavour to reward good parliamentary behaviour and recognise integrity rather than simply penalising the absence of it. On Tuesday 15th June, at Parliament House Canberra, the two inaugural awards were made.

Election 2010 – Parties & candidates integrity and transparency commitments

ACCOUNTABILITY ROUND TABLE CALLS FOR ACTION ON POLITICAL CORRUPTION, DONATIONS

The Accountability Round Table seeks public commitments from all parties and candidates to establish:


1. a comprehensive independent integrity system for the Commonwealth incorporating a general purpose Commonwealth anti-corruption agency, which includes educative, research and policy functions and which is provided with all necessary powers and is subject to parliamentary oversight and

2. an enquiry by the Australian Law Reform Commission into regulation of the funding of political parties and candidates to achieve equality of access and integrity in our democratic system.

Book: “Money and Politics: The Democracy We Can’t Afford

Money and Politics: The democracy we can’t afford

Joo-Cheong Tham ,
9781921410093, UNSW Press, August 2010, 336pp

Money plays a controversial role in Australian politics. Political donations may spark claims of secret contributions and corruption. Do corporations or trade unions have undue infl uence over political parties by way of donations? Meanwhile, the activities of well-paid lobbyists come under the spotlight, with claims of preferential treatment and ‘favours for mates’. What role should lobbyists have in our political system? Public funding for political parties also attracts its share of criticism. Has it made politics fairer or entrenched the position of the major parties? There is a fear that while Australian politics has the trappings of a democracy, they mask an oligarchy where political power rests with only a few rich and powerful citizens and corporations. Money and Politics: The democracy we can’t afford systematically dissects how political parties raise and spend money and asks what this means for our democracy.

Available UNSW Press

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